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Galen Rowell. “Untitled (Bay Area Wild)”. Marin County, CA, USA.

Galen Rowell. “Untitled (Bay Area Wild)”. Marin County, CA, USA.

  
Emmet Gowin. “Edith and Elijah”. 1968. Danville, VA, USA.

Emmet Gowin. “Edith and Elijah”. 1968. Danville, VA, USA.

Albert Watson. “The Macallan’s ‘Masters of Photography’ - Untitled (Tevasa Cooperage)”. 2010. Jerez de la Frontera, Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. (The Macallan).

Albert Watson. “The Macallan’s ‘Masters of Photography’ - Untitled (Tevasa Cooperage)”. 2010. Jerez de la Frontera, Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. (The Macallan).

Carleton Watkins. “Photographs of the Columbia River and Oregon: Flour and Woolen Mills”. 1867. Oregon City, OR, USA.

Carleton Watkins. “Photographs of the Columbia River and Oregon: Flour and Woolen Mills”. 1867. Oregon City, OR, USA.

Erwin Blumenfeld. “Hitler / Grauenfresse (Face of Horror) - In 1933, when Blumenfeld was just beginning to concentrate seriously on his photography, he reacted to Hitler’s rise to power in Germany with a photomontage. This outstanding piece of work, probably his most famous photograph, symbolizes and anticipates the dictator’s dehumanization. Following on from the political themes in some of his early collages, he here combined different negatives – a skull and a portrait of Hitler – to make a single print. It was exhibited in Paris in 1937 but had to be withdrawn because the German Ambassador was so incensed by it. In 1943 the American military chose Blumenfeld’s photomontage to drop millions of copies over German cities in the form of a propaganda leaflet. Blumenfeld was, by that time, the world’s highest paid fashion photographer”. 1933. Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands.

Erwin Blumenfeld. “Hitler / Grauenfresse (Face of Horror) - In 1933, when Blumenfeld was just beginning to concentrate seriously on his photography, he reacted to Hitler’s rise to power in Germany with a photomontage. This outstanding piece of work, probably his most famous photograph, symbolizes and anticipates the dictator’s dehumanization. Following on from the political themes in some of his early collages, he here combined different negatives – a skull and a portrait of Hitler – to make a single print. It was exhibited in Paris in 1937 but had to be withdrawn because the German Ambassador was so incensed by it. In 1943 the American military chose Blumenfeld’s photomontage to drop millions of copies over German cities in the form of a propaganda leaflet. Blumenfeld was, by that time, the world’s highest paid fashion photographer”. 1933. Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands.

Eugène Atget. “Impasse Barbette (Impasse des Arbalétriers)”. 1898. Paris, France.

Eugène Atget. “Impasse Barbette (Impasse des Arbalétriers)”. 1898. Paris, France.

El Lissitzky. “Portrait of Kurt Schwitters”. 1924. Weimar, Thuringia, Germany. (Kurt Schwitters).

El Lissitzky. “Portrait of Kurt Schwitters”. 1924. Weimar, Thuringia, Germany. (Kurt Schwitters).

Chien-Chi Chang. “Untitled”.

Chien-Chi Chang. “Untitled”.

Frederick Sommer. “Ondine”. 1950.

Frederick Sommer. “Ondine”. 1950.

Bruce Nauman. “Infrared Outtakes: Neck Pull (photographed by Jack Fulton)”. 1968.

Bruce Nauman. “Infrared Outtakes: Neck Pull (photographed by Jack Fulton)”. 1968.

Imogen Cunningham. “Nude”. 1932.

Imogen Cunningham. “Nude”. 1932.

Berenice Abbott. “Changing New York: Automat, 977 Eighth Avenue between West 57th & 58th Streets, Manhattan”. 1936. New York, NY, USA. (Federal Art Project, Works Progress Administration).

Berenice Abbott. “Changing New York: Automat, 977 Eighth Avenue between West 57th & 58th Streets, Manhattan”. 1936. New York, NY, USA. (Federal Art Project, Works Progress Administration).

Edward Weston. “Tina Reciting”. 1924. (Tina Modotti).

Edward Weston. “Tina Reciting”. 1924. (Tina Modotti).

Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin. “Dans le Vent (In the Wind)”. 2008. (Daria Werbowy, Vogue Paris).

Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin. “Dans le Vent (In the Wind)”. 2008. (Daria Werbowy, Vogue Paris).

Eugene Richards. “Cocaine True, Cocaine Blue - Untitled (East New York, Brooklyn)”. New York, NY, USA.

Eugene Richards. “Cocaine True, Cocaine Blue - Untitled (East New York, Brooklyn)”. New York, NY, USA.